DevOps

DevOps is a new term emerging from the collision of two major related trends. The first was also called “agile infrastructure” or “agile operations”; it sprang from applying Agile and Lean approaches to operations work.  The second is a much-expanded understanding of the value of collaboration between development and operations staff throughout all stages of the development lifecycle when creating and operating a service, and how important operations has become in our increasingly service-oriented world.

Start doing DevOps with Azure

Azure offers an end-to-end, automated solution for DevOps that includes integrated security and monitoring. Take a simple path to developing and operating your apps in the cloud. The developer experience of Azure DevOps integrates with the tools of your choice. If you’re a Java developer—great—Azure provides native integrations with Eclipse. If you build with Jenkins, use it to easily deploy directly to Azure. Bring your development, IT operations, and quality engineering teams together to build, test, deploy, monitor and manage applications in the cloud. For apps and workloads with latency, regulatory, or other custom requirements, Azure, combined with Azure Stack, provides a consistent hybrid DevOps experience. Use your skills, processes, and tools in the environment in which your app needs to run.

DevOps has strong affinities with Agile and Lean approaches. The old view of operations tended towards the “Dev” side being the “makers” and the “Ops” side being the “people that deal with the creation after its birth” – the realization of the harm that has been done in the industry of those two being treated as siloed concerns is the core driver behind DevOps. In this way, DevOps can be interpreted as an outgrowth of Agile – agile software development prescribes close collaboration of customers, product management, developers, and (sometimes) QA to fill in the gaps and rapidly iterate towards a better product – DevOps says “yes, but service delivery and how the app and systems interact are a fundamental part of the value proposition to the client as well, and so the product team needs to include those concerns as a top-level item.” From this perspective, DevOps is simply extending Agile principles beyond the boundaries of “the code” to the entire delivered service.

What is DevOps Not?

It is not “they’re taking our jobs!”  Some folks think that DevOps means that developers are taking over operations and doing it themselves.  Part of that is true and part of it isn’t.

It’s a misconception that DevOps is coming from the development side of the house to wipe out operations – DevOps, and its antecedents in agile operations, are being initiated out of operations teams more often than not.  This is because operations folks (and I speak for myself here as well) have realized that our existing principles, processes, and practices have not kept pace with what’s needed for success.  As businesses and development teams need more agility as the business climate becomes more fast-paced, we’ve often been providing less as we try to solve our problems with more rigidity, and we need a fundamental reorientation to be able to provide systems infrastructure in an effective manner.

Now, as we realize some parts of operations need to be automated, that means that either we ops people do some automation development, or developers are writing “operations” code, or both.  That is scary to some but is part of the value of the overall collaborative approach. All the successful teams I’ve run using this approach have both people with deep dev skill sets and deep ops skill sets working together to create a better overall product. And I have yet to see anyone automate themselves out of a job in high tech – as lower level concerns become more automated, technically skilled staff start solving the higher value problems up one level.

© 2018 Skafos Consulting. All rights reserved.
Call Now ButtonCALL NOW
error: Content is protected !!